BES Forest Ecology Group

A British Ecological Society Special Interest Group

FEG Events 2016

The Forest Ecology Group is excited to announce our sponsored events and meetings for 2017.

2017 begins with a series of meetings and workshops addressing related forest biodiversity themes, to be held in Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and Wiltshire. These events will be co-sponsored by a network of other environmental organisations and the FEG is very pleased to join these in supporting our dedicated meeting organisers. Later on in the year, we are pleased to be able to support an Oxford based meeting, which will tackle the human cost of forest exploitation around the world and measures needed to tackle this. Details follow below:

5-6 April 2017, Biodiversity effects of ‘irregular’ silviculture in native woodland.

Organisers: Christine Reid and Andy Poore. Location: Dorset / Wiltshire border

The aim of this seminar is to bring together researchers, forestry practitioners, ecologists and policy makers to explore the results of a major research project into the management of forest structure to enhance biodiversity in native semi-natural woodland.

‘Irregular silviculture’ is a type of Continuous Cover Forestry which is being promoted and practised in the forestry sector as a potentially financially viable way of increasing biodiversity, while improving resilience to pests, diseases and climate change.

The seminar will be a mix of indoor and outdoor presentations and discussion, looking at the initial results from the research projects, the silviculture techniques involved and further research approaches using novel innovative techniques.

£35 per delegate

To book contact administrator@ccfg.org.uk

 

May 2017, Wilder Visions – Wood Meadows and Pastures.

Organiser: Ian Rotherham. Location: Sheffield

Wood meadows and pastures are a part of a new ‘Wilder Vision’ for the future landscape. This meeting will place future landscapes into a valid framework of historical ecology and bring together key experts to exchange ideas and best practice. The workshops, field visits and meeting events will provide platforms to launch a new national initiative with the aim to conserve or create a wood meadow / wood pasture in every parish. The intention is to ensure that such future conservation aspirations are underpinned by good, robust, ecological science. The meeting will promote, organise and disseminate the work of this initiative, which is being supported by South Yorkshire Biodiversity Research Group with Ancient Tree Forum, Woodland Trust, Natural England, Hagge Wood Trust and Knepp Castle Estate.

Contact for further details: Ian Rotherham I.D.Rotherham@shu.ac.uk

 

Spring-Summer 2017, Raising Awareness of Ancient Woodland Indicators and the underpinning science.

Organiser: Ian Rotherham. Location: South Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire

This meeting builds on a related Forest Ecology SIG project on woodland indicators from several years ago bringing further research findings from the detailed evaluation of botanical indicators.

The research has major practitioner impact – as it informs the planning and conservation processes with regard to ancient woodlands – presently under threat because of a lack of effective evidence-based designation. The intention of this series of events is to develop and disseminate best practice guidance for ancient woodland indicators.

Contact for further details: Ian Rotherham I.D.Rotherham@shu.ac.uk

 

Late 2017, Defending Forests: Risks, strategies and sources of support.

Organisers: Rebecca Latchford and Fran Lambrick. Location: Oxford, UK

As global and national companies pursue the short-term and unsustainable exploitation of natural resources; competition over land, forests, water and raw materials is fierce. The imbalance of power between rural, working people, indigenous peoples, and activists – and the corporations and governments, sometimes backed by military forces, has led to a sharp increase in the killing of these so-called ‘environmental defenders’ over the last decade. While climate change remains at the fore in the discourse on environmental protection, it is nevertheless unconscionable that activists striving to defend the environment are still murdered for their efforts – in 2014 alone, 116 environmental defenders were killed.

The conference will bring together individuals who are facing such risks on the ground, to share their experiences and challenges of this work. The aim will be bring an audience of environmental NGOs, Human Rights advocacy organisations, legal professionals, researchers academics, and the media to discuss this issue and work together on solutions to improve the personal security conditions of these environmental defenders. The event is co-supported Not 1 More – an organisation formed in 2015 in direct response to the violence experienced by environmental defenders.

Contact for further details: Rebecca Latchford rebecca.latchford@echoecho.org.uk; Fran Lambrick franlambrick@googlemail.com

 

 

 

Past meetings below:

________________________________________________________________

 

The Forest Ecology Group is excited to announce our sponsored events and meetings for 2016.

PiedFly.Net 2016 annual meeting

Date: 19 March 2016

Location: Wooda Farm, Devon Wildlife Trust Centre, Doddiscombeleigh, Devon

PiedFly.Net is a citizen science project monitoring breeding woodland birds and woodland phenology. The network provides data collected to many science projects including the BTO Nest Record Scheme, Track a Tree and university and NGO research groups right across Europe, and also undertakes its own research. Each year the network holds a one day meeting shortly before the bird breeding season, the only occasion when all the monitors involved come together. The meeting is designed to provide feedback to monitors on the previous seasons results putting them in a long-term context, highlight new ways in which their data can be collected, submitted or used, and to show how their data is being used in scientific work. The meeting aims to increase members awareness of woodland ecology more generally. The 2016 meeting includes talks from visiting guest speakers Will Kirby (RSPB, Hawfinch declines), Bob Harris (formation of national study group and integrating data from north west England), Sophie Bell (PiedFly.Net, geolocators and provisioning rates) and Malcolm Burgess.

Time: 11am-3pm

Contact: Malcolm Burgess, University of Exeter/PiedFly.Net

Please see www.piedfly.net for more about the network, current projects and publications.

 

Defending Forests: Risks, strategies and sources of support

Date: TBC (A date between 6th June – 7th July 2016)

Location: Oxford (TBC)

As global and national companies pursue the short-term and unsustainable exploitation of natural resources; competition over land, forests, water and raw materials is fierce. The imbalance of power between rural, working people, indigenous peoples, and activists on the one hand, and companies often backed by government and in some cases military forces, has led to a sharp increase in the killing of environmental defenders over the last decade. While international decision makers discuss measures to protect the planet and prevent extreme climate change, it is unconscionable that activists striving to defend the environment are murdered for their efforts.

In 2014 at least 116 environmental defenders were killed. This is almost double the number of journalists killed over the same period. While there are several international campaigns to prevent the killing of journalists, there is little public awareness of, and pressure to end, the killing of environmental defenders.

Potential audience and participants:

The conference will bring together those individuals who are actively facing these risks on the ground, to share their experiences and challenges of this work, with an audience comprising of environmental NGO’s, Human Rights advocacy organisations, legal professionals, with researchers and academic’s from a broad range of discipline, along with the media.

Conference aim:

The aim will be to discuss and define strategies to support the work of frontline environmental defenders and to think about solutions to improve their personal security conditions. There will be a focus on sharing practical experiences from other fields and allowing those in attendance to contribute to the discussion.

Conference Organiser and Host: Not One More

Not One More – is an organisation that has recently formed in 2015 in direct response to the violence experienced by environmental defenders and recognizing that for many individuals and small organizations they are extermly isolated from networks that could support their personal security.

As an organization we aim to co-ordinate support that does exist with those who need it and were gaps exist, highlight them and look for solutions.

The date is yet to be confirmed but it will be held somewhere between 6th June and 7th July, (we intend to follow on from the Chatham House Illegal Logging meeting in London & they have as yet to finalise their date).

Contact: notonemore.global@gmail.com to be added to the mailing list for this conference.

Fieldwork in the forest: training secondary school teachers to use British woodlands for curriculum teaching and projects

Date: July 2016 (TBC)

Location: Mill Wood, Combe near Woodstock, West Oxfordshire

In 2015 BES Forest Ecology Group supported a consultation workshop with secondary school teachers to explore the potential of British woodlands for teaching the Geography and Science curriculum for Key Stages 3 to 5 (11 -18 years old). The results of this workshop and further recent research into the Geography secondary curriculum by the Sylva Foundation have informed the follow on training project ‘Fieldwork in the Forest’. This one day training course will:

  • Introduce Geography and Science teachers to British forest ecology and woodland management.
  • Provide fieldwork training in a range of techniques that are required by GCSE and A Level specifications.
  • Identify fieldwork investigation questions and collect and analyse fieldwork data using techniques required of students by GCSE and A Level specifications.
  • Provide participants with resources and case studies on British forest ecology and woodland management, guidance on fieldwork techniques and sampling in woodlands, guidance on accessing local woodlands.

Contact: Jen Hurst, Education Manager, Sylva Foundation, 01865 408018, jen@sylva.org.uk

Widening the scope of Waxcap research – Waxcap fungi as indicators in wood pastures, lowland grasslands and shadow woods

Date: Late summer – Autumn 2016 (TBC)

Location: Nottinghamshire, Sheffield, North Lincolnshire (TBC)

There will be 3 x 1-day workshops and field visits during late summer and autumn 2016 to Clumber Park National Trust Country Park in Nottinghamshire, Woodhouse Washlands Yorkshire Wildlife Trust Nature Reserve near Sheffield, and Crowle, North Lincolnshire. These national, cross-disciplinary workshops & field visits will take forward issues and ideas raised at the BES-supported 2014 symposium and the upland workshops in previous years. The events will address issues in lowland wood pasture and heath, in shadow woods, and in lowland wet grasslands. We will shortly be launching our on-line guide to waxcaps and associated fungi as indicators of grasslands and wood pastures – check the website for details.

Partners: South Yorkshire Biodiversity Research Group, Thorne & Hatfield Moors Conservation Forum [THMCF], Yorkshire Wildlife Trust, and Lincolnshire Naturalists’ Union, JBA Consulting, Sheffield Hallam University and others.

Location: Sheffield Hallam University

Organizer: info@hallamec.plus.com  or telephone 0114 2724227,

Follow the website for updates and programmes: www.ukeconet.org

SHADOW WOODS – a search for lost landscapes

Date: Spring & Summer 2016 (TBC)

For 2016, we have an exciting Forest Ecology SIG project on ‘Shadow Woods – a search for lost landscapes‘. Based on 3 years’ citizen science work so far with the Peak National Park, this has implications for understanding past and future woodland and forest landscapes. The ideas are far-reaching and the scope of the work is Europe-wide. Participants involved come from a wide area of Great Britain and Europe and the results are to be disseminated to an extended audience through a final, celebratory event and the launch of a long-term project. The ideas relate to the BES-supported ‘Wild Thing’ conferences, which had representatives from around 20 countries. There will be a launch event and workshops to recruit & train community science volunteers (spring 2016); then work with citizen science volunteers to help close the information gaps (volunteer surveys during spring & summer 2016), and the outputs of the project will be a report and other publications plus an on-line guide. For stakeholders there will be interpretation and recommendations on management, an education pack, flier, key cards and an app; and finally, the celebratory event and launch / conference.

Contact: info@hallamec.plus.com or telephone 0114 2724227

Follow the website for updates and programmes: www.ukeconet.org

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